Heyman On Adrian, Jeter, Hamilton

SI's Jon Heyman leads his latest column with a discussion about Padres first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, who he feels is likely to be shopped hard at this year's trade deadline.  I've noted before that Gonzalez's market should not be limited to big-spending clubs, as he's set to earn just $10.25MM for 2010-11.  It's fitting that Heyman believes as many as 10 to 12 teams already inquired, including the Red Sox, Mets, Mariners, and Dodgers.  On to Heyman's other rumors…

  • Heyman spoke to "two executives from competing teams" who believe Derek Jeter "could ask for a six-year deal."  The idea is that a six-year extension would take Jeter to age 42, as Alex Rodriguez's contract does.
  • Heyman notes that Josh Hamilton turned down a four-year, $24MM offer from the Rangers last year.  The security might've made sense for Hamilton given his injury problems.
  • One executive Heyman spoke to believes the availability of decent free agents, perhaps continuing into the season, could reduce trading.


36 Responses to Heyman On Adrian, Jeter, Hamilton Leave a Reply

  1. ReverendBlack 5 years ago

    Adrian Gonzalez trade negotiations are soon to become the new Johnny Damon contract negotiations.

    • Mooks 5 years ago

      The rumors surrounding him and Cliff Lee if the Mariners are struggling this July will be astonishing. By July, every baseball writer in America will have a Twitter account and give constant updates from their unnamed (non-existent?) sources. I truly feel bad for the good folks who run this site and have to try to keep up with it.

      • humbb 5 years ago

        At least our friends here won’t have to keep up with the Brett Favre stories/tweets. I will be removing ESPN from my cable favorites when those start.

      • humbb 5 years ago

        At least our friends here won’t have to keep up with the Brett Favre stories/tweets. I will be removing ESPN from my cable favorites when those start.

    • Mooks 5 years ago

      The rumors surrounding him and Cliff Lee if the Mariners are struggling this July will be astonishing. By July, every baseball writer in America will have a Twitter account and give constant updates from their unnamed (non-existent?) sources. I truly feel bad for the good folks who run this site and have to try to keep up with it.

  2. ReverendBlack 5 years ago

    Adrian Gonzalez trade negotiations are soon to become the new Johnny Damon contract negotiations.

  3. Triteon 5 years ago

    The fact that California has one of the highest income tax rates in the nation hurts the chances of the Padres or Dodgers landing him. Massachusetts’ is half of California’s and Illinois’ is a third. Washington state has no state income tax…Seattle would be almost a 10% raise by itself.

    • redlake 5 years ago

      interesting point

      also, I just don’t see any way that the Dodgers and Padres could pull off a trade like this.maybe Boston

      • Guest 5 years ago

        The Dodgers have enough in the farm to make a trade, it would just ruin our franchise if it happened. We need to keep the entire farm intact this season. 2011 can get read ugly, even uglier if Withrow, Gordon, E. Martin, others aren’t playing for us. I will not root for this team if they purge the rest of the system. We would have a top 5 farm system easy if McCourt spent money.

        • redlake 5 years ago

          true enough

          Fact is that this trade or any other significant trade will not be happening under current ownership. Frank McCourt has no balls. He is profiteering and not sincere in trying to put together a team that could actually win. I can only hope that the divorce will cause this team to be sold to someone, anyone. Fortunately, for now, there is a good core of young players and I am personally optimistic about this year.I’ve been a Dodgers fan too long to quit now.

        • redlake 5 years ago

          true enough

          Fact is that this trade or any other significant trade will not be happening under current ownership. Frank McCourt has no balls. He is profiteering and not sincere in trying to put together a team that could actually win. I can only hope that the divorce will cause this team to be sold to someone, anyone. Fortunately, for now, there is a good core of young players and I am personally optimistic about this year.I’ve been a Dodgers fan too long to quit now.

      • Guest 5 years ago

        The Dodgers have enough in the farm to make a trade, it would just ruin our franchise if it happened. We need to keep the entire farm intact this season. 2011 can get read ugly, even uglier if Withrow, Gordon, E. Martin, others aren’t playing for us. I will not root for this team if they purge the rest of the system. We would have a top 5 farm system easy if McCourt spent money.

    • redlake 5 years ago

      interesting point

      also, I just don’t see any way that the Dodgers and Padres could pull off a trade like this.maybe Boston

    • bleedDODGERblue 5 years ago

      1st.. He doesn’t get to decide where he is traded to..
      2nd.. I really don’t think ballplayers care about income taxes, they’re getting paid millions to play baseball, the only things I think would come into play are if the teams going to be in contention and where he’s comfortable playing, but like I said, THE PLAYER DOES NOT GET TO CHOOSE

      • markjsunz 5 years ago

        Players from other teams have to pay taxes in california for the amount of money they earned while playing in California during road games.I do not know the laws in other states however. Gonzalez is a perfect fit for the padres the mexican border is only a few miles away and he puts a lot of butts in seats. The Dodgers have a large
        Latino fan base, gonzalez would be the biggest thing since fernando mania.

      • markjsunz 5 years ago

        Players from other teams have to pay taxes in california for the amount of money they earned while playing in California during road games.I do not know the laws in other states however. Gonzalez is a perfect fit for the padres the mexican border is only a few miles away and he puts a lot of butts in seats. The Dodgers have a large
        Latino fan base, gonzalez would be the biggest thing since fernando mania.

      • Triteon 5 years ago

        But he does have a choice where he ultimately signs, and that’s where I was going. Though even following a trade he absolutely gets to choose, because any player always has the option to stop playing (forfeiting quite a bit in the process, of course.)
        Also, I said it hurts the chances, which it does, all things being equal. Granted — the Dodgers are in a better situation to reach the playoffs and beyond versus, say the Royals. So as a competitor AGon may value an LA contract at $X million over a KC contract at $X million. But if the bidding comes down to sun, fun and 10% taxes vs. chowder, 6 feet of snow and 5% it’s my thought that the BoSox would have an edge with equal gross contracts.

      • Triteon 5 years ago

        But he does have a choice where he ultimately signs, and that’s where I was going. Though even following a trade he absolutely gets to choose, because any player always has the option to stop playing (forfeiting quite a bit in the process, of course.)
        Also, I said it hurts the chances, which it does, all things being equal. Granted — the Dodgers are in a better situation to reach the playoffs and beyond versus, say the Royals. So as a competitor AGon may value an LA contract at $X million over a KC contract at $X million. But if the bidding comes down to sun, fun and 10% taxes vs. chowder, 6 feet of snow and 5% it’s my thought that the BoSox would have an edge with equal gross contracts.

      • DickAlmighty 5 years ago

        I’ve seen this point made a number of times on this board, and I have to correct it (yet again). Baseball players absolutely do care about income taxes.

        (1) If you flip through a book of income tax cases (not what I do in my spare time, I used to practice tax law), you’d be shocked how many of the cases involve professional athletes’ residency issues (where an athlete says he lives in State A with low income taxes, and State B with higher income taxes is trying to say he’s a resident of State B).

        (2) People who make more money care more about income taxes, not people who make less money — the fact that baseball players get paid “millions to play baseball” does not lead to the conclusion that they don’t care about income taxes; on the contrary, they have the most to lose (and gain) based on state income tax rates, and they care the most about how much of their money they’re losing in taxes (especially since most baseball players only have a short period where they can max out their earning potential, so they have to keep as much as possible while they’re earning it).

        In summary, state income taxation is absolutely a factor in where players choose to work, live, etc.

    • bleedDODGERblue 5 years ago

      1st.. He doesn’t get to decide where he is traded to..
      2nd.. I really don’t think ballplayers care about income taxes, they’re getting paid millions to play baseball, the only things I think would come into play are if the teams going to be in contention and where he’s comfortable playing, but like I said, THE PLAYER DOES NOT GET TO CHOOSE

    • AirmanSD 5 years ago

      Also it doesn’t matter where you actually play. It where you reside. Such as Damon resides in FL though he plays in MI, he doesn’t pay income tax in MI, he would pay it in FL if it had one.

      • That’s not true. If you live in an income tax free state and work in a state that has an income tax you still have to pay income tax to that state as a non-resident. Additionally, if you travel out of state for work, depending on how you file, you’ll be taxed according to that states tax laws during the time you’re working there.

        I have plenty of experience with this being a NH resident (no income tax) that’s worked in MA (income tax) for the past 11 years. I also travel a good amount for work.

        • Triteon 5 years ago

          Well stated. I live in Illinois and work in Missouri, so I wind up paying both states (IL taxes are higher than MO, so I pay just a bit OOP every year to Chicag…I mean Springfield.)

        • Triteon 5 years ago

          Well stated. I live in Illinois and work in Missouri, so I wind up paying both states (IL taxes are higher than MO, so I pay just a bit OOP every year to Chicag…I mean Springfield.)

      • That’s not true. If you live in an income tax free state and work in a state that has an income tax you still have to pay income tax to that state as a non-resident. Additionally, if you travel out of state for work, depending on how you file, you’ll be taxed according to that states tax laws during the time you’re working there.

        I have plenty of experience with this being a NH resident (no income tax) that’s worked in MA (income tax) for the past 11 years. I also travel a good amount for work.

      • DickAlmighty 5 years ago

        Yep. This is totally false.

      • DickAlmighty 5 years ago

        Yep. This is totally false.

    • AirmanSD 5 years ago

      Also it doesn’t matter where you actually play. It where you reside. Such as Damon resides in FL though he plays in MI, he doesn’t pay income tax in MI, he would pay it in FL if it had one.

  4. Triteon 5 years ago

    The fact that California has one of the highest income tax rates in the nation hurts the chances of the Padres or Dodgers landing him. Massachusetts’ is half of California’s and Illinois’ is a third. Washington state has no state income tax…Seattle would be almost a 10% raise by itself.

  5. Rich_in_NJ 5 years ago

    You could probably get two unnamed executives to say just about anything.

    • monroe_says 5 years ago

      So true. Giving a source anonymity – even in sports – should be given some thoughtful consideration. It’s supposed to be a tool to get at the truth, not to make wild speculations in an attempt (as in this case) to drive up the price a competitor will pay to keep its main asset.

    • monroe_says 5 years ago

      So true. Giving a source anonymity – even in sports – should be given some thoughtful consideration. It’s supposed to be a tool to get at the truth, not to make wild speculations in an attempt (as in this case) to drive up the price a competitor will pay to keep its main asset.

    • redlake 5 years ago

      and change their minds if you so desire.

      There is no validity to unnamed sources.

  6. Rich_in_NJ 5 years ago

    You could probably get two unnamed executives to say just about anything.

  7. Roy Munson 5 years ago

    Who are these “competing” Executives??? Two interns from fenway?? The head Grounds-crew at Camden Yards??… The Mascot for the Rays??

    Time and Time again the media goes of and wildly predicts things about the Yanks… And are off 98% of the time….When the Yanks don’t spend money or the prospects Cashman is not doing his Job… When they do… The yanks buy championships… I’m beginning to think that Peter Gammons is leaking stories and quotes from people that don’t exist….

  8. Roy Munson 5 years ago

    Who are these “competing” Executives??? Two interns from fenway?? The head Grounds-crew at Camden Yards??… The Mascot for the Rays??

    Time and Time again the media goes of and wildly predicts things about the Yanks… And are off 98% of the time….When the Yanks don’t spend money or the prospects Cashman is not doing his Job… When they do… The yanks buy championships… I’m beginning to think that Peter Gammons is leaking stories and quotes from people that don’t exist….

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