Poll: Was Manfred The Right Choice?

Major League Baseball owners yesterday elected MLB COO Rob Manfred as the successor to Bud Selig and next commissioner of baseball. While Manfred’s vote technically passed unanimously, there was a pronounced split for much of the day. Reportedly, 22 of the 30 teams were in favor of Manfred for much of the day, but it took quite some time for a 23rd team — said by Jon Heyman of CBS Sports to be the Nationals — to give Manfred the final vote he required. At that point, the remaining seven teams altered their vote as “an olive branch for posterity” (to use the words of the L.A. Times’ Bill Shaikin), knowing that their preferred candidate had no chance to win anyhow.

That preferred candidate was Red Sox chairman Tom Werner, although Werner wasn’t the only other finalist to give a presentation to owners yesterday. Joining Werner and Manfred was MLB executive vice president of business Tim Brosnan, though he appeared to be the first of the three to withdraw from consideration.

All three had their merits. Manfred has resided over labor negotiations and can boast 19 years of peace between MLB and the MLBPA, and he also has worked tirelessly to implement the current drug testing system in addition to spearheading last year’s Biogenesis investigation. Werner, whose background was in television before jumping to the baseball world, was believed by his supporters to possess the necessary knowledge to bolster MLB’s television ratings and revitalize interest in baseball among the youth of the United States and Canada. Brosnan’s business acumen was his strongest selling point, though he looked to be a distant third place behind his competitors not long after the announcement of the three finalists. (Of course, all three had their flaws as well, and MLBTR readers can get a brief rundown of each candidate in this piece from USA Today’s Bob Nightengale.)

Prior to the announcement of the three finalists, other candidates for the position had included Giants president Larry Baer, Disney chief executive Bob Iger, Braves chairman Terry McGuirk, Tigers GM Dave Dombrowski, MLB Advanced Media CEO Bob Bowman and former Yale University president Richard C. Levin.

Manfred has long been rumored to be the preferred successor of retiring commissioner Bud Selig, and in the end, the seemingly likeliest option wound up getting the nod. Manfred will become just the 10th commissioner of the league and presumably will hold this post for a considerable amount of time. Should baseball fans be happy about the outcome of the election? Let’s find out how¬†the MLBTR universe feels…


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33 Comments on "Poll: Was Manfred The Right Choice?"


Member
start_wearing_purple
10 months 21 days ago

Honestly I can’t really say I can have respect for any commissioner.
-Landis did restore order to baseball but also enforced segregation with an iron fist.
-Chandler may have approved Robinson’s contract but did threaten lifetime bans for even talking about labor strikes.
-Frick was alright, unless you believe Branch Rickey who said Frick wrote a racist report about how integration would hurt the game.
-Kuhn, well the fact that he’s in the Hall and Marvin Miller isn’t says a lot. Kuhn’s blackballing of Curt Flood is a black eye in the game’s history. Kuhn also was the first comish to actively ignore PEDs.

-Selig may be credited with a long labor peace and cleaning up PEDs. But he was part of the reason for the 1994 strike and had actively ignored PEDs until it became a problem.

And those are considered the good commissioners. Either way, from the articles I’m reading it seems like the owners just want a commissioner who is prepared to take on the players union and risk breaking the long peace.

Member
Douglas Rau
10 months 21 days ago

Were is the “Can’t be any worse than Selig” option? The man let PED run rampant in the game. How many Biogenesis scandals under his watch? The man is a disgrace and should have been removed from his position.

Member
SportsNut76
10 months 21 days ago

I personally am in the wait and see category.

Member
Orebaugh
10 months 21 days ago

Continuity is good, I suppose, but does that mean we get the same old same old for all of Manfred’s term? What does he have that Cadillac Bud didn’t?

Member
Melvin Mendoza, Jr.
10 months 21 days ago

Continuity of a Bud Selig administration is never good.

Member
SportsNut76
10 months 21 days ago

Because the longest term of labor peace in baseball history is a bad thing?

Member
start_wearing_purple
10 months 21 days ago

Selig keeps getting credit for the labor peace but he was a major reason for the 1994 players strike.

Member
Lefty_Orioles_Fan
10 months 21 days ago

But I think the owners are overpaying and in turn the fans are overpaying. Guaranteed contracts in my opinion are awful and a real scourge to the game.

Member
Mike1L
10 months 21 days ago

Do you actually think the owners would cut you in if they got a hard salary cap, elimination of guaranteed contracts, and a reduction in payroll?

Member
Richard Patel
10 months 21 days ago

I agree with Mike1L: As I see it, salary caps only exist if revenue sharing with the players goes way up, and that means ticket prices aren’t going to go down. If anything, a new competitive balance may bring more fans back to TV, and that could mean more revenue from television.

Member
start_wearing_purple
10 months 21 days ago

Even if the players decided to play for free, the price of tickets will rise every year.

Member
JamieMoyer
10 months 21 days ago

I was surprised how little support my campaign received!

Member
Melvin Mendoza, Jr.
10 months 21 days ago

Sorry Jamie, but we would like to inject some youth into the position coming from Selig.