Discussion: Derek Jeter

In 2008, Derek Jeter posted the lowest full-season OPS (.771) of his career.  That's not a bad number for a 34-year-old shortstop, but it was enough to make some Yankee fans wonder if their captain was on the decline and what might happen when Jeter's contract expired after the 2010 season.  Would Jeter insist on remaining at shortstop?  Would he want a salary close to the $21MM he's set to make in 2010?  And, if Jeter continued to struggle and the Yankees balked at committing so much money to their star, would New York fans have to cope with seeing their beloved Jeter in another team's uniform in 2011?

These questions still remain to some extent a year later, but in the wake of Jeter's excellent .334/.406/.465 performance in 2009 and the Yankees' 27th World Series title, there is a lot less fear in New York that a Jeter extension will turn into an albatross on the club's payroll. 

As per team policy, contract negotiations with Jeter won't begin until after the season, but it's safe to assume that this delay won't be a distraction for either Jeter or the team.  Tyler Kepner of the New York Times predicts "a quick resolution and a new contract that greatly enriches Jeter while preserving his spotless reputation."  There won't be much, if any, drama in the negotiations since Kepner notes that Jeter recognizes the value of his clean image as a franchise hero, and the Yankees similarly want to keep their "dependable, well-spoken, maintenance-free front man."

Kepner thinks the 10-year, $275MM contract that Alex Rodriguez signed with New York after the 2007 season may serve as a benchmark for Jeter's next deal.  Given how much the economics of both baseball and the world have changed just in two years' time, it would be surprising to see even the Yankees commit that much cash to a player who will be 36 in June, no matter how big of a franchise icon he may be.  Also, as Kepner notes, Jeter has managed to avoid the scrutiny that comes with big-money contract negotiations ever since signing his current deal back in 2001.  It's unlikely that Jeter would want to change that as he enters the twilight years of his career and the chances increase that he'll have more seasons like his 2008 campaign. 

Something in the neighborhood of a six-year contract that pays Jeter around $22MM per year (a nod to his uniform number) might be a total more to the liking of both parties.  Jeter gets a slight raise from his previous contract, is locked up until he's 42 years old, and is amply rewarded for his contributions to the team while still leaving the Yankees with a bit of flexibility to sign other players (like, for example, fellow Yankee legend Mariano Rivera, whose deal is also up after 2010).

There could also be a mutual option year or two tacked onto the end of the deal in case the 42-year-old Jeter still wants to play and/or he has a chance of breaking Pete Rose's hit record.  Kepner raised the possibility that Jeter may ask for incentive clauses for passing various hit plateaus, similar to how A-Rod's contract provides him with a $6MM bonus whenever (or if-ever) he passes the career home run totals of Willie Mays, Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron and then tying and breaking Barry Bonds' all-time record.  Jeter is just 253 hits away from 3,000, but, as Rose himself said to Sports Illustrated's Joe Posnanski, “You tell Derek that the first 3,000 are easy.”

Since we can assume that 99 percent of Yankee fans want to see Jeter retire in the Bronx, what do you think would be an ideal contract to keep the captain in the fold until the end of his career?

 


Leave a Reply

152 Comments on "Discussion: Derek Jeter"


Member
Guest
5 years 4 months ago

If Derek Jeter changes teams in 2011, than Omar Minaya had the best 2009/10 off-season ever.

There is a 100% chance he will remain on the Yankees for the rest of his career.

Member
Utley4God
5 years 4 months ago

4yrs 100 mm…

Member
Guest
5 years 4 months ago

I’d say 3/70MM

Member
Encarnacion's Parrot
5 years 4 months ago

Something in the neighborhood of a six-year contract that pays Jeter around $22MM per year (a nod to his uniform number) might be a total more to the liking of both parties.

Given how much the economics of both baseball and the world have changed just in two years’ time, it would be surprising to see even the Yankees commit that much cash to a player who will be 36 in June, no matter how big of a franchise icon he may be.

Put those 2 together and perhaps the column makes more sense. $22-milion a season for an aging SS would be a steal for Jeter. God love the man as he’s one of the more prolific players to grace the game [out of many], but a 36-year old player doesn’t make that kind of cash, especially after you mention how the baseball economy has changed.

I still think a 3-year $40-45-million contract is what he’s worth making nowadays, but his 2010 season will dictate that.

Member
Guest
5 years 4 months ago

maybe you shouldn’t write exagerated obnoxious comments that make no sense.

Member
BrianMancash
5 years 4 months ago

Dear Mr. Cashman,

Give Jeter whatever he wants. The amount of money the Yankees make off of Jeter every year is probably a lot more than any contract you offer him. He’s the poster boy of the Yankees and some would argue of the MLB too. Be it right or wrong, I would simply hand Jeter a blank contract and have him fill in the amount and years. I trust that he knows his worth and what he should be getting paid. Bottom line: Derek Jeter in a uniform other than Yankee pinstripes just doesnt work. Re-sign him whatever the cost.

Member
Guest
5 years 4 months ago

Mason94, Agreed.

Member
5 years 4 months ago

As a Red Sox fan, I agree. Please lock him up for a long time, for some ridiculous amounts of money. When his 2010-2014 look worse than his 2008, the rest of baseball will have no sympathies for you and your bloated payroll.

Member
jeffreyisretarded
5 years 4 months ago

Says a fan of a team who raised their payroll by around 30 million in a rebuilding period.

Member
Tom_Zig
5 years 4 months ago

At least the Yankees only employ one third baseman and aren’t still currently paying probably 4 other players to play for other teams.

You can pretend to be a small market team all you want, but the fact is your team out spent the Yankees this offseason. In fact the Yankees signed only 1 free agent this past offseason.

Member
5 years 4 months ago

“You can pretend to be a small market team all you want, but the fact is your team out spent the Yankees this offseason. In fact the Yankees signed only 1 free agent this past offseason.”

I’m not pretending the Red Sox are small market team, just pointing out that bad decisions like signing Jeter until he’s 42 are what gave the Yankees trouble from 2005-2008. Saddling your payroll with enormous contracts for underperforming players is a recipe for disaster.

Also, of course the Red Sox outspent the Yankees this offseason (so did many other clubs) but that’s like buying a Ferrari on Tuesday and pointing out that your friend who bought a Toyata on Wednesday outspent you on Wednesday: it’s completely nonsensical. Measure 2010 payroll vs. 2010 payroll, not new money spent in 2009-2010 offseason.

Member
Guest
5 years 4 months ago

Hey Bonehead, you do realize that your team has an expected payroll north of $170mm going into this season and you do not have more than 1 all star and not a single HOF’r.

Get your facts straight. You think Boston fans were being scrutinzed this season for their lack of production? Just wait until the end of June when you are 10 games out. You can bank on that. $170mm plus for a bunch of over 30 yo (most are 35 +) band aids.

You do also realize that Boston is #1 in the league with the highest average age of players at approx 33.5, 34.

Member
theroadto28
5 years 4 months ago

2010 payrolls are Yankees at 185, Redsox at 170
2009 revenue are Yankees at 253, Redsox at 201
The Yankees are just a better team because they put the money back into the team and dont hate on us the fans when we just have the best owner in baseball.

Member
boy9988
5 years 4 months ago

And cause NY is the largest market on the continent and is more than capable of supporting 4 teams? Duh! Of course NY can put all that money back into the team. The rest of baseball doesn’t get that kind of revenue and owners would have to pour their own money, that they couldn’t recoup, into the team to get to that kind of payroll. Yay! They Yankees are better cause they play in a city with 10M people! Don’t kid your self, they Yankees have an extreme unfair advantage in almost every respect. It would be really nice once in a while if the Yankee fans could just recognize this. It would make the rest of us feel better and not cast the stereotype stigma that New Yorkers have of being pompous jerks.

Member
theroadto28
5 years 4 months ago

As you can go and look up teams like the Marlins who have a ridiculously low payroll made revenue of over a hundred million last year and still keep their payroll low as this shows they actually can put the money back in their team.
And the redsox revenue was well over two hundred million but they still kept their payroll at around 135 million last year, your owners could of easily gotten texiera or sabathia and stolen them or one of them from the Yanks but they chose to not put that revenue towards payroll

Member
boy9988
5 years 4 months ago

From Cots

2010 Payroll obligations as of 2/14/10

NYY – $210.99M
BOS – $165.82M
PHI – $138.05M
CHC – $135.30M
NYM – $122.16M
DET – $121.70M

Still absurd. Just in case anyone was wondering.