Takahashi Seeks Three Years, $12-15MM

5:18pm: David Waldstein of The New York Times reports that the two sides are expected to announce later today that they could not reach a deal. The Mets will have to release Takahashi per the terms of their contract.

11:56am: Hisanori Takahashi has until midnight to negotiate a deal with the Mets, but it doesn't look like the sides will reach a deal unless the left-hander lowers his demands. Takahashi is asking for a three-year deal worth $4-5MM per season, according to Jon Heyman of SI.com (on Twitter). Adam Rubin of ESPNNewYork.com confirms Heyman's report (on Twitter).

The Mets offered Takahashi a one-year deal before current GM Sandy Alderson took over, according to the New York Times. If the Mets don't agree to a deal with Takahashi tonight, he would not be able to re-sign in New York and pitch before May 15th. That essentially means he's signing elsewhere if he doesn't reach an agreement with the team tonight.


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32 Comments on "Takahashi Seeks Three Years, $12-15MM"


Guest
MetsEventually
4 years 8 months ago

See ya later Takahashi hame ha

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EdinsonPickle
4 years 8 months ago

Wow, that’s aiming a bit high. I don’t see anyone going over two years.

Guest
4 years 8 months ago

I’d like to see Taka back with the Mets but not at $12-$15 million. I hope they can find a middle ground.

Guest
4 years 8 months ago

“If the Mets don’t agree to a deal with Takahashi tonight, he would not be able to re-sign in New York and pitch before May 15th.”

Why is that? Is that how it is with all free agents and their current teams? How does that work?

Guest
Guest
4 years 8 months ago

According to the major leagues’ Rule 8 (i) (2), any player who is released after midnight Aug. 31 and before the next opening day cannot sign a major league contract with the same team until May 15 the following year. so… because they apparently released him at some point (?) if he doesn’t sign by midnight, he has to wait until May 15th to sign with the Mets, unless he wants to sign a Minor League deal,

(so during that time period, he would be a free agent, who can sign a Major League Contract, at any point, with any other team, besides the Mets)

Guest
leberquesgue
4 years 8 months ago

Which side would put that in a contract? I don’t see how it is in either one’s interest.

Guest
Guest
4 years 8 months ago

sorry, I was wrong, it’s some rule, I edited my post now

Guest
4 years 8 months ago

It is a common clause in contracts for older guys coming from Japan or other foreign leagues. It prevents them from having to be under team control for 6 years and allows them to get paid more like the veteran they are if they perform well. So the Mets had until 10/31 but then 11/5 after the extension to sign him or they had to release him.

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Marc_from_Brooklyn
4 years 8 months ago

I take it that the collective bargaining agreement prohibits a free agency clause or a mandatory non-tender clause for players without tenure so mandatory unconditional release is the only means of automatically making a player without seniority a free agent. Perhaps it’s time to rethink the May 15 restriction of 8(i)(2). They eliminated the May 15 rule for a team’s own free agents not that long ago.

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Marc_from_Brooklyn
4 years 8 months ago

I take it that the collective bargaining agreement prohibits a free agency clause or a mandatory non-tender clause for players without tenure so mandatory unconditional release is the only means of automatically making a player without seniority a free agent. Perhaps it’s time to rethink the May 15 restriction of 8(i)(2). They eliminated the May 15 rule for a team’s own free agents not that long ago.

Guest
iCracked
4 years 8 months ago

3/10 sounds good, although sandy will probably not want to start off his tenure wiith a high risk move, 3.xx is alot for a reliever with one year experience, look at okajima now

Guest
4 years 8 months ago

Taka’s ERA as a reliever was quite a bit lower at 2.04. His peripherals were also much better. His major flaw as a starter was the fact that the more he went through the opposing teams batting order the more he got hit around.

1st PA: .598 OPS against
2nd PA: .918 OPS against
3rd PA: .990 OPS against

You can take all of this with a grain of salt given that it’s only a year’s worth of data, but it’s definitely telling. He’s best suited in the ‘pen and maybe a spot start here or there in a pinch.

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iCracked
4 years 8 months ago

thats what i was trying to say, alot of these japanese players come over to the states, do well there first year, then as you said hitters figure them out.