Rosenthal’s Latest: Willis, Dunn, Griffey

Ken Rosenthal has a new column up today.  Not too much brand new material but worth discussing nonetheless.

  • Rosenthal opines that Dontrelle Willis is currently at his peak value.  Mark Buehrle is off the market.  Dontrelle is seemingly healthy and under control through 2009.  There was a scare, though, when Willis had a sore forearm in June.  Rosenthal points out that despite mediocre stats the past couple of seasons, Willis still has an ace aura about him.  That’s probably because of his near-Cy Young in ’05 and the way he took the league by storm in ’03.  The Mets, Mariners, Dodgers, Red Sox, Rockies, and Diamondbacks could all be interested in the Marlins start shopping Willis.  Larry Beinfest seems to be leaning against it though.
  • The Padres may still consider trading for Adam Dunn, but will see how Milton Bradley plays over the next few weeks first.  The Reds and Padres aren’t a great match, as the Padres don’t have many big-name prospects.  Maybe something like Clay Hensley plus Chase Headley (those names are oddly similar), if the Reds are sour on Edwin Encarnacion?
  • Many members of the Mariners’ front office would like to bring Ken Griffey Jr. back, but CEO Howard Lincoln "harbors resentment over Griffey’s departure in 2000."  That makes it sound like Griffey left via free agency, but of course he was actually traded to the Reds.  I did a little digging on that situation, and found that the Mariners offered Griffey an eight-year, $140MM contract in September of 1999.  Junior turned that down and requested a trade in November, citing a desire to play closer to his Orlando home.  Death threats also turned him off from Seattle.  At that time he named the Reds, Braves, Astros, Indians, and Mets as teams he’d like to play for.  By December Griffey decided he’d only accept a trade to Cincinnati – he even vetoed a trade to the Mets.
  • If healthy, David Wells plans to pitch again in ’08.  The Padres probably wouldn’t mind having him back.



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