Why I Chose My Agency: Jamey Carroll

Twins infielder Jamey Carroll owns a .354 career on-base percentage, sixth in baseball history among those who have played at least 200 games each at second base, shortstop, and third base.  The 11-year veteran is represented by Jonathan Maurer and Mike Montana of Millenium Sports Management, and he recently spoke to MLBTR about his agency.

On when he first came into contact with Maurer and Montana:

I believe it was when I was in Triple-A, because I was rooming with a teammate named Scott Mitchell, who was with Jonathan at the time.  I didn't have an agent, and he wanted to know if I needed anybody, and at the time I wasn't sure.  I didn't feel like I was the type of player that needed somebody.  A lot of these players are prospects, the guys that need it.  I met him and he was willing to accept me into his management company, and I didn't really know what I had that was going to be helpful or to offer him.  He took me in when I was in a situation in my career where I wasn't sure where I was really heading.  Nobody's knocking down the door of a utility guy in Triple-A that's 27 years old, to represent him.  

On why he chose to go with MSM:

They both seemed to have that faith in me, so it became a no-brainer.  They weren't a big group, I felt like there was a lot of personal one-on-one.  They were open to being around and offering their time whenever we need it.  I liked the family-oriented atmosphere, not in it for the numbers, but more for the right people and the right types of players.  I like that small, close-knit-type family feeling.

On the role his agents filled for him, prior to contract negotiations:

They were into finding out who I was in the [Montreal Expos] organization, what the organization felt about me, and where I fit and what my chances were to keep getting opportunities.  I think that's one of the most important things, where you sit within the organization.  How they view you and what goals they have for you, I think those are tough questions to ask and they were able to do that for me.  I was at a time where I had quite a few years in the minor leagues and wasn't sure what my future held.  To me that was more important than worrying about contracts and shoe deals and stuff like that.

On his involvement in contract discussions:

My wife and I are extremely involved.  It helps that my wife is a negotiator for a living [formerly a recruiter for the Gap corporation], so we were able to have good insight and anticipate how the progress goes and ask questions.  Having her in my corner to know kind of questions to ask.  I enjoyed it, I think it's an interesting process.  I wanted to know everything that was involved in it.

On how the free agent process worked:

The first time through, it was a lot of, "When somebody calls, please call."  But then I think the second time through, a certain point in the day you'd have your phone call and see what had happened, see what teams were involved, what the thought process of the teams were, where you think that you fit.  You wait to a certain point, gather all the information, and start filing through.  I'd get a certain team that was interested, I would then go and look at the team myself, see what the roster is like, and see where I thought that I would fit as far as playing time with that team.

On whether he's recommended his agents to other players:

It's ultimately an atmosphere, especially at this level, where everybody has their agent.  Most of the time, if somebody's having an issue, that's when you hear about somebody who has changed agents.  I keep an open ear for it, but at the same time, it's a tough atmosphere when it comes to that.  A lot of people are in a situation like I am now, they've had an agent for some time.  If the opportunity arises, I definitely will throw my two cents in.

Check out our other interviews in the Why I Chose My Agency series with Ted Lilly, Ryan Ludwick, Cody Ross, Aramis Ramirez, Adam Wainwright, Jeremy Affeldt, David Wright, Jay Bruce, and Matt Holliday.


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