Paco Rodriguez Rumors

Mets Monitoring Dodgers, Rockies In Search For Lefty Relief

4:46pm: The Mets are also intrigued by Rockies left-hander Rex Brothers, writes Adam Rubin of ESPN New York. A team official told Rubin at the Winter Meetings that Brothers was of interest to the Amazins, and that interest is apparently still alive. The 27-year-old Brothers will earn $1.4MM this year after a down season in 2014. Last year, he struggled to a 5.59 ERA as his control spiked and he posted a career-worst 6.2 BB/9 rate.

Brothers was excellent, however, from 2011-13, especially when considering his home park. In that time, he notched a 2.82 ERA with 11.2 K/9 and 4.8 BB/9 out of the Colorado ‘pen. He’s had a good Spring Training thus far and is under team control through 2017. Brothers has a career 2.40 ERA on the road compared to a 4.51 mark at Coors Field.

As Rubin notes, the Rox also have southpaw Boone Logan, though his contract seems especially prohibitive for the Mets; Logan is owed $5.5MM this year and $6.25MM in 2016.

4:01pm: The Mets are “keeping an eye on” three Dodgers left-handed relief options — J.P. Howell, Paco Rodriguez and Adam Liberatore — in case any of the three become available, reports Mark Saxon of ESPN Los Angeles (via Twitter).

The Mets have a known need for a bullpen lefty following Josh Edgin‘s Tommy John surgery and have been connected to Baltimore’s Brian Matusz on multiple occasions this spring. Of course, Matusz sounds to be more available than any of the three Dodger southpaws, based on Saxon’s wording.

Howell would seem to have a spot in the Dodgers’ bullpen locked down, as the former Ray has posted a 2.19 ERA over the past two seasons with Los Angeles and is entering the second season of a two-year, $11.25MM contract signed following a strong first year with the Dodgers. Besides that fact, Howell is slated to earn $4MM this season, and the Mets reportedly aren’t even comfortable with Matusz’s $3.2MM salary, so it’s hard to envision a great fit with Howell.

Rodriguez and Liberatore, however, could conceivably be more available, and neither would cost much more than the Major League minimum in terms of salary. Rodriguez, 23, was the Dodgers’ second-round pick in 2012 and reached the Majors that same season. However, despite a strong 2013 followup to his brief 2012 cameo, (2.32 ERA, 10.4 K/9, 3.1 BB/9), Rodriguez saw just 14 regular-season innings with the Dodgers last year. Rodriguez struggled to a 4.40 ERA in Triple-A’s hitter-friendly Pacific Coast League in 2014 and was slowed by a strained shoulder muscle as well. With just one year, 120 days of MLB service time, Rodriguez likely wouldn’t be arbitration eligible for another two years, making him an understandably appealing target.

It’s unclear how the new front office views Rodriguez, but the old regime clearly had some concerns over his readiness. The former front office invested significantly in free agent relievers last winter (including Brian Wilson and Chris Perez — neither of whom panned out) and quickly optioned Rodriguez to Triple-A after a rough patch in late April. New president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman, GM Farhan Zaidi and VP Josh Byrnes may have more faith in Rodriguez and be reluctant to part with him.

As for Liberatore, the Dodgers only acquired him this offseason. The 27-year-old had previously been with the Rays, so it was hardly surprising to see Friedman pull both Liberatore and Joel Peralta from the Rays organization in a trade with his former colleagues. Liberatore is older for a prospect, but he has exceptional numbers at the Triple-A level, where he’s worked to a 2.40 ERA in 146 1/3 innings. His most impressive work came in 2014, when he worked to a 1.66 ERA with 11.9 K/9 and 2.1 BB/9 in 65 innings.

For what it’s worth, both Liberatore and Rodriguez have had excellent Spring Training campaigns, combining for 13 innings of scoreless relief. That likely doesn’t mean much, and considering the fact that both have Minor League options remaining, there’s no pressure for the Dodgers to move either, even if they don’t break camp in the bullpen. Also to be considered is the fact that relief help is a need for the Dodgers themselves, particularly in the wake of an injury to closer Kenley Jansen that may only sideline him through mid-April but could leave him on the shelf into mid-May. The Dodgers have a number of contracts they’d like to shed (e.g. Alex Guerrero, Erisbel Arruebarrena) but the Mets would hardly seem to be in a financial position to sweeten the pot by taking on some salary in a trade.


Paco Rodriguez, Antonio Bastardo Change Agencies

Left-handed relievers Paco Rodriguez and Antonio Bastardo have changed agencies, according to Liz Mullen of Sports Business Journal. Rodriguez, formerly represented by BKK Sports, will be joining the MVP Sports Group and is now represented by agency president Dan Lozano. Bastardo, who had been represented by ACES, is now a client of Greg Genske of the Legacy Agency.

The 23-year-old Rodriguez blitzed through the minor leagues and was the first 2012 draftee to appear in the Major Leagues, as he made his debut on Sept. 9, 2012, just months after being selected in the second round. He was a lights-out setup man for the Dodgers in 2013, but he has somewhat curiously spent much of the 2014 campaign at Triple-A (perhaps due to some September/postseason struggles last year).

Rodriguez turned in a 2.35 ERA with a 63-to-19 K/BB ratio in 53 2/3 innings for the Dodgers in 2013 and has posted a 4.35 ERA in 10 1/3 innings this season. Overall, he’s notched a 2.52 ERA with 80 strikeouts against 26 walks in 71 1/3 innings out of the Dodgers’ bullpen. He has struggled against right-handers in 2014, yielding a .250/.395/.469 batting line between the Majors and Minors. He’s currently on the DL with a strained teres major muscle in his left shoulder but is expected to return in September.

Bastardo, who will turn 29 next month, is heading into his final offseason of arbitration eligibility before hitting the free agent market. He’s earning $2MM this season and has produced a 4.47 ERA with 11.3 K/9 and 5.0 BB/9 in 54 1/3 innings. Since cementing himself as a member of the Phillies’ bullpen back in 2011, Bastardo has pitched to a 3.48 ERA with 11.6 K/9 and 4.5 BB/9 in 207 big league innings. He’s held opposing lefties to a .188/.286/.345 batting line in his career, though right-handed hitters have a similarly feeble .655 OPS against Bastardo.

The representation changes for Rodriguez and Bastardo are both reflected in the MLBTR Agency Database, which contains agent information on more than 2,000 Major League and Minor League players. If you see any errors or omissions within the database, please let us know via email: mlbtrdatabase@gmail.com.